IELTS
Preparation

IELTS

GENERAL

The IELTS General Training test is for those who are going to English speaking countries for secondary education, work experience or training programs. It is also a requirement for migration to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK.

IELTS Course

IELTS Preparation Course Online

READING * WRITING * LISTENING * SPEAKING

IELTS

ACADEMIC

The IELTS Academic test is for people applying to study in higher education institution or professional registration in an English speaking environment. It reflects some of the features of academic language and assesses whether you are ready to begin studying or training.

General Overview

There are two types of the IELTS test:  IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training. Listening and Speaking are the same for both tests, but the subject matter of the Reading and Writing components differs depending on which test you take.

  • The Listening, Reading and Writing components of all IELTS tests are completed on the same day, with no breaks in between them.
  • The Speaking component, however, can be completed up to a week before or after the other tests. Your test centre will advise.
  • The total test time is 2 hours and 45 minutes.

We can help you prepare here at becksonlineenglish  by using our English Tutor For IELTS Online.

IELTS Listening

30 minutes

You will listen to four recordings of native English speakers and then write your answers to a series of questions.

Recording 1

Recording 2

Recording 3

Recording 4

a conversation between two people set in an everyday social context.

a monologue set in an everyday social context, e.g. a speech about local facilities.

a conversation between up to four people set in an educational or training context, e.g. a university tutor and a student discussing an assignment.

a monologue on an academic subject, e.g. a university lecture.

IELTS Speaking

11 – 14 minutes

The speaking component assesses your use of spoken English. Every test is recorded.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

the examiner will ask you general questions about yourself and a range of familiar topics, such as home, family, work, studies and interests. This part lasts between four and five minutes.

you will be given a card which asks you to talk about a particular topic. You will have one minute to prepare before speaking for up to two minutes. The examiner will then ask one or two questions on the same topic.

you will be asked further questions about the topic in Part 2. These will give you the opportunity to discuss more abstract ideas and issues. This part of the test lasts between four and five minutes.

IELTS General Reading

60 minutes      40 questions

IELTS General Writing

60 minutes

These are materials you are likely to encounter on a daily basis in an English-speaking environment.

Topics are of general interest. There are two tasks:

Task 1

Task 2

Task 3

Task 4

Task 5

Task 6

Task 7

Task 8

Task 9

Task 10

Task 11

Multiple Choice – The best answer from four or five alternatives A, B, C, D or E

Identifying Information – This task type assesses the test takers’ ability to recognise particular points of information conveyed in the text.

Identifying Writers Views – Students will be given a number of statements and asked: ‘Do the following statements agree with the views/claims of the writer?’ They answer ‘yes’, ‘no’ or ‘not given’ in the boxes on their answer sheet. The questions are in the same order as the information in the text: that is, the answer to the first question in this group will be located in the text before the answer to the second question, and so on.

Matching Information – Students locate specific information in the lettered paragraphs/sections of a text, and write the letters of the correct paragraphs/sections in the boxes on their answer sheet.

Matching Headings – Students must match the heading to the correct paragraphs or sections, which are marked alphabetically, and write the appropriate Roman numerals in the boxes on their answer sheets.

Matching Features – Students match a set of statements or pieces of information to a list of options.

Matching Sentence Endings – Students are given the first half of a sentence based on the text and choose the best way to complete it from a list of possible options. 

Sentence Completion – Students complete sentences in a given number of words taken from the text, writing their answers on the answer sheet. 

Summary Completion – Students are given a summary of a section of the text, and are required to complete it with information drawn from the text.

Diagram Completion –  Students complete labels on a diagram which relates to a description contained in the text.

Short answer questions –  Students answer questions about factual details in the text. Students must write their answers in words or numbers on the answer sheet.

Task 1

Task 2

You will be presented with a situation and asked to write a letter requesting information, or explaining the situation. The letter may be personal, semi-formal or formal in style.

In Writing Task 1, students are presented with a situation and required to write a personal response in the form of an informal, semi-formal or formal letter of at least 150 words in the answer booklet provided.

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You will be asked to write an essay in response to a point of view, argument or problem. The essay can be fairly personal in style.

In Writing Task 2, students write a semi-formal/neutral discursive essay of at least 250 words in the answer book provided.

The task instructions give information about a point of view, argument or problem. They then tell test takers how to discuss this, which may involve providing general factual information, outlining and/or presenting a solution, justifying an opinion, evaluating evidence and ideas.

IELTS Academic Reading

60 minutes      40 questions

IELTS Academic Writing

60 minutes

Academic Reading in Detail

A detailed look at the paper with links to related resources.

Task 1

Task 2

Task 3

Task 4

Task 5

Task 6

Task 7

Task 8

Task 9

Task 10

Task 11

Multiple Choice – The best answer from four or five alternatives A, B, C, D or E

Identifying Information – Students will be given a number of statements and asked: ‘Do the following statements agree with the information in the text?’ They are then required to write ‘true’, ‘false’ or ‘not given’ in the boxes on their answer sheets.

Identifying Writers Claims – Students will be given a number of statements and asked: ‘Do the following statements agree with the views/claims of the writer?’ They are required to write ‘yes’, ‘no’ or ‘not given’ in the boxes on their answer sheet.

Matching Information – Students are required to locate specific information within the lettered paragraphs/sections of a text, and to write the letters of the correct paragraphs/sections in the boxes on their answer sheet.

Matching Headings – Students must match the heading to the correct paragraphs or sections, which are marked alphabetically.

Matching Features – Test takers are required to match a set of statements or pieces of information to a list of options. The options are a group of features from the text, and are identified by letters.

Matching Sentence Endings – Students are given the first half of a sentence based on the text and asked to choose the best way to complete it from a list of possible options. They will have more options to choose from than there are questions.

Sentence Completion – Students complete sentences in a given number of words taken from the text. They must write their answers on the answer sheet.

Summary Completion – Students are given a summary of a section of the text, and are required to complete it with information drawn from the text. The summary will usually be of only one part of the passage rather than the whole.

Diagram Completion –  Students are required to complete labels on a diagram, which relates to a description contained in the text.

Short answer questions –  Students answer questions, which usually relate to factual information about details in the text. This is most likely to be used with a text that contains a lot of factual information and detail.

Task 1

Task 2

You will be presented with a graph, table, chart or diagram and asked to describe, summarize or explain the information in your own words. You may be asked to describe and explain data, describe the stages of a process, how something works or describe an object or event.

There are two Writing tasks and BOTH must be completed.

In task 1, test takers are asked to describe some visual information (graph/table/chart/diagram) in their own words. They need to write 150 words in about 20 minutes. 

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In Writing Task 2, test takers are given a topic to write about an academic or semi-formal/neutral style. Answers should be a discursive consideration of the relevant issues. Test takers should make sure that they read the task carefully and provide a full and relevant response.

In Task 2, they respond to a point of view or argument or problem. They need to write 250 words in about 40 minutes.

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